Tidy your way to a blissful bedroom Japanese-style

When did you last have a good clear out? Japanese Organising Consultant Marie Kondo and her international best-selling book, 'The Magic of Decluttering' will teach you to be ruthless about it. It promises a happier and healthier life to anyone brave enough to let go and surround themselves with only the things that bring them joy. 

Her 'KonMarie' method of tidying is unconventional to say the least. She encourages you to treat your belongings as people - to look after them, so that they can take care of you. But bear with it. Follow her advice to touch everything you own, while asking yourself whether it genuinely brings you joy. Hang onto it if it does (and give it a new home where you can see it), bin if it doesn’t. Simple. 

Two million people have bought Kondo's declutter bible, determined to ditch their unwanted belongings in pursuit of bliss. But you don't have to. Although she recommends tackling your entire home at once, we want to help you focus on bringing calm to your bedroom for better sleep.

‘Do not even think of putting your things away until you have finished the process of discarding’ – Marie Kondo.

Tackle your wardrobe first

According to Kondo, we don’t have emotional connections to our clothes, so it's easier declutter your wardrobe first. But your clothes have feelings. And stuffing them on hangers makes them sad.

You're to gather every outfit you own and dump it on the floor, ready for sorting. Bin off colour-shirts, and anything ill-fitting or past its prime. Thank each item for its service as you pack your charity bags. Kondo believes that your clothes will be happier if you folded them into horizontal rows in your drawers. So sort your socks into colour order and enjoy her instructional video below! It’s certainly a fabulous space saving technique for your under bed storage.

 

 “Depending on thickness, you can fit 20 to 40 pieces of folded clothing in the same amount of space required to hand 10” – Marie Kondo

Then your books

Time and again, we've told you the well-being benefits of reading bedtime stories. Especially if it keeps you away from your phone's blue glare! But Kondo wants you to drastically reduce the number of books in your home - including your bedroom. So when you've read the final page, it's time to get rid - unless seeing it on your shelf brings you joy. Yes, the same rule even applies to her book, 'The Magic of Decluttering'. 

File away papers

Whether your bedroom doubles up as an office or not, you'll likely have papers in there - everything from bills to school reports and shopping lists. Surprise surprise, Kondo has a vendetta against these too. They don't bring joy, so ditch every scrap you can. (We recommend shredding your personal stuff.) File them neatly. Never pile them high. Piles are untidy and stress-causing.

And then the rest 

Now it's time for the nitty-gritty. Kondo loves organising small items into Tupperware or boxes of all shapes and sizes. So after decluttering your bedroom dressing table, tidy your jewellery into one.  If you have too many products in your en-suite, only keep your favourites. Whip them down and store them out of sight in, you've guessed, another box. 

Until you have to face your sentimental belongings 

Now everything else is done, dusted and stored away again, it doesn't matter if you slow down and reminisce. Be brutal and throw away any and everything which doesn't bring you joy. If your little one has outgrown their toys or teddies, Kondo says to take a breath and get rid. Remember, you're doing this to create a blissful home...

Can't stomach it? 

Kondo says, "I think most people will be successful in their homes with my method, but maybe it's not for everybody". Here at Bed Guru, we strongly agree with tidying for happiness and mental well-being. In cleaning for a calm and relaxing bedroom for a better night's sleep.

But contrary to 'The Magic of Decluttering', we recommend space saving storage beds to achieve it. They give you the best of both worlds – an uncluttered space, and somewhere to vertically stack your guilty treasures. 

 Video Source: New York Magazine